That’s My Bike

This post is written for Friday Fictioneers. The challenge is to write a complete story with a beginning, middle and end using the picture prompt below.

PHOTO PROMPT© Lisa Fox

His prognosis had been a devastating blow. The concussions Ben had received during the bombing had left him without any memory. The doctors had tried just about every treatment to recover even a tiny portion of his life before the war. So far nothing had worked.

His brother had an idea. He did a goggle search and found it. Working with the museum curator they wheeled the piece of art to his bedside.

Ben’s eyes suddenly went wide. “That’s my bike!” Ben yelled.

Fear of Tunnels

This post is written for Friday Fictioneers. The challenge: write a complete story, using the picture prompt below, in one hundred words or less. My story follow the picture below. Cheers!

kent
PHOTO PROMPT – © Kent Bonham

Waking up in the middle of the street in Strasbourg at three in the morning was not the type of vacation they had in mind. They had planned the rail trip for months. It wasn’t the Orient Express but it wasn’t like hopping a freight train in the U.S.

It was all part Gary’s rehabilitation. Poor guy was terribly afraid of dark enclosed spaces. This was their first practice run.

“Listen Gary, when a train goes through a tunnel and it gets dark, you don’t throw away the ticket and jump off. You sit still and trust the engineer.”

In The Dark I Found

…nothing. It’s still hard after all these years to reach out for someone in the hour before daylight and find nothing. Nothing to touch. Nothing to snuggle up to. Not even the heavy breathing that characterized her final days. She had been my faithful companion for the last fifteen years.

Lucy also had an attitude problem. I would joke with my friends that she even walked with an attitude. It was like her body language said “You want a piece of me? Well bring it on mister.” She became ill a couple of years ago and her state of health was deteriorating quickly. In her last days she became very irritable at the slightest little change in her daily routine. I now had to feed her myself. And she hated taking her pills that the doctor had ordered for her. “What do they know about my state of heath. I bet they look it all up on Goggle and then regurgitate the information hoping that  I would understand what the hell they were saying.” On her last medical appointment the doctor had prepared me for the worse case scenario.

Her death came very quickly. I put her in the hospital  the night  before and  the  doctors called me late the next afternoon to say that I should come down to the hospital quickly to say my goodbyes.

As I entered the hospital I was greeted by a very somber technician who lead me to a “grieving  room”. This room smelled of death. There was no hiding or masking of that smell. After a few minutes they brought her body in. She looked wide awake. Too wide awake. She had her leg bandaged in preparation for inserting the needle that would take her to another world. In a few minutes  it was over. I stayed and prayed for what seemed like days. I don’t usually cry but I sure was making up for that in a big hurry as the tears would not stop.

When I was ready  to leave they had already put  her in an urn. She now rests on top of the fireplace mantle with our  other  deceased cats.

Highball and Seven Murders — Episode II

Episode one can be found here:Episode One.

Melinda, still not sure what had transpired, turned to Jill and said “What just happened? I saw four men, including 2 police officers enter the garage and then the sound of guns being fired I think and then the same four men emerge but this time with the two police officers leading the other men at gun point. That building is  where our husbands were going to meet with Mr. Morgan wasn’t it?”

Sirens could be heard in the background as Jill replied, “Yes, but I think something has gone terribly wrong.”

Detective Bacon, a Sargent with the Chicago Police Department along with his partner Lee Johnson were first on the scene. 

The Coffin

I’m in my coffin with the lid open. It’s quite comfy actually. I just would like to pull that silk sheet over my shoulders. I’ve got my business suit on. They, whoever they are, must have looked deep in my closet to find it. I haven’t worn this suit in seven years. I know it’s been at least seven years because I’ve been retired that long and have not worn a suit since. Until today apparently.

I can’t see above the rim of this coffin but I feel (I can still feel?) like I’m in a real quite place as their seems to be a fair amount of movement around me but I can not heard anything. But above me are four people, two on each side, that I recognize. Mom and Dad on one side and my sister and wife on the other. They have sad faces as they look down upon me. What happened I wonder?

My mother: “He pulled the plug on me. I could have survived.”

Her lips are not moving but I can read her thoughts. Mom, you had so many surgeries the doctors would not perform anymore. Your body would not have survived the onslaught of another operation.  You were 84 mom and you had a very good life with lots of friends and caring family. Yes, it was my decision to let you go

My sister: “He pulled the plug on me too. I know I was not responsive and had been a vegetable for months but I still could feel emotions.”

But Sis, you were born with one kidney, the other failed after a few years, you were on dialysis for years, your body was exhausted and worn out. You were only 56 years old but most of those years you suffered. You had friends, family, and neighbors to help you, but you mainly suffered on your own. Yes, it was my decision to let you go.

My father: “He pulled the plug on me too, the little weasel.”

Dad, you fell off the toilet and suffered severe brain damage that was irreversible. The doctors told me you would never regain consciousness ever again. Yes, it was my decision to let you go.

My wife: “Yes, I am the one who pulled the plug on you.”

The Trip to Tucson

Leaving (Part 1)

Gloria told her parents she would be leaving home in exactly one year. They didn’t believe her. She had said this many times before but both sensed that she may actually leave this time.

She was an only child, now 35 years old. She was a graduate of Montana State University with an undergraduate degree in Sociology, with a major in Women’s and Gender Studies. A hell of a lot that did for her here in Deer Lodge. She did a Google search and found out their were 48 job openings within 25 miles of Deer Lodge. Most of the jobs were on ranches, restaurant’s, or the largest employer, the Montana State Prison. Working there would be a nightmare.

She hated her job as an Office Manager with a local law firm. Ok, she had started out as an administrative assistant and then “promoted” after a year to Office Manager. It was the same old shit with a different title. She knew they did not want to lose her because they knew they could not get anyone else as efficient and dependable for what she was being paid. But what could she do to improve her life. She did not want to spend the rest of her life in this desolate place.

Her best friend Holly had been accepted at the University of Arizona. She would be working toward her Masters degree in the Drama Department.

At dinner a few months ago Holly had floated the idea of them both moving to Arizona and sharing an apartment together. For sure this would be better than living in her little run down trailer which was parked on her Aunt’s property. The rent was reasonable, but she always felt that her Aunt was keeping an eye on her.

Gloria had thought about this for a couple of months before making her final decision. She would go with Holly.  Her decision was hastened by the fact she did a “Johnny Paycheck” with her boss and told him “to shove it”. And then to add insult she added that if he were twice as smart he would still be an idiot. She knew where the door was but he showed it to her anyway.

According to Google Maps it was 1,219 miles, almost a straight shot south from Deer Lodge to Tucson. They figured a 3 to 4 day trip would get them there.

Since Gloria rented her trailer and Holly had a small unfurnished apartment, they were able to get all of their worldly possessions into one 4 by 6 U-Haul. Gloria had the better car, a 1977 Buick regal. Holly had a 1963 Ford Ranchero that her brother gave her. He was a carpenter and had build a wood top for the back of the Ranchero. Looked like hell but it still ran and she did not think she would need a car in Tucson anyway.

They had a small going away party, which her parents never attended, the night before. They had planned to leave around 10 the next morning. But they did a through cleaning of all the liquor containers, beer cans, and roaches that were the result of their little party. It was almost noon when they finally departed. Holly led the little convoy. As they left an empty beer can fell off the back bumper of the U-Haul.

Their adventure had begun.